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Public Lectures 2005

Grand Prize 2005: IM Dong-kwon

Title
Explore Cultural Linkage
Date
September 17, 2005 (16:00 - 18:00)
Venue
ACROSS Fukuoka Event Hall
Panelist
Professor Sano Kenji (Graduate School of History and Folklore Studies, Kanagawa University)
Panelist
Assistant Professor Nagamatu Atsushi (Faculty of Humanities, Miyazaki Municipal University)
Panelist
Professor Matsubara Takatoshi (Research Center for Korean Studies, Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University)
Coordnator
Professor Inaba Tsugio (Graduate School of Human-Environment Studies, Kyushu University)

Public Lecture by Prof. Im Dong - kwon was held in ACROS FUKUOKA on September 17, and he introduced his idea and thought on his specialized field in his lecture, talks with panelists.

keynote speech

In his keynote speech, Professor Im commented on the origin of culture propagation by referring to the ethnic cultural cases seen in today’s Korea and Japan.  He argued that cultures – some maintaining their original styles and the others being modified to suit the climate of the area – had taken root on their soil along with the flow of people.

panel discussion

At the following panel discussion, panelists each discussed what similarities Korea and Japan share by raising specific examples.  Professor Sano spoke of the cultural exchange viewed from geographical features between the Korean Peninsula and Japan as well as wooden and stone creatures, both symbols of folk belief.  Professor Nagamatsu presented an example of the Chikuzen biwa lute to illustrate the role played by blind priests and its history.  Professor Matsubara talked about oceanic folk culture such as divers and sea festivals to clarify the similarities.  Professor Matsubara referred to Professor Im’s remark “flow of people is flow of culture.  People move over with culture.”  Professor Im answered this with an example of the Korean Envoys on how people and culture flowed.  He said that culture was not only directly transmitted by the Korean craftsmen and priests in their contact with their Japanese counterpart, but they also handed down the culture to the general public, for example, Tojin-odori (literally “the people of Tang” dance).   

Finally Professor Inaba reconfirms Professor Im’s remark of “culture changes” in a way to focus on the cultural difference between the coastal area and inland even in Korea as well as to focus on the reverse cultural propagation from Japan to Korea.  He concluded the forum by pointing out to us that it is important to have a flexible viewpoint to folk cultural ties between Korea and Japan.

Academic Prize 2005: Thaw Kaung

Title
Preserve Palm-leaves in Digital Format
Date
September 17, 2005 (13:00 - 15:00)
Venue
ACROS Fukuoka Event Hall
Speaker
Emeritus Professor Okudaira Ryuji (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Speaker
Professor Saito Teruko  (Faculty of Foreign Studies, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Speaker
Professor Ito Toshikatsu (Faculty of Letters, Aichi University)
Coordnator
Professor Ishizawa Yoshiaki (President, Sophia University)

Public Lecture by Dr. Thaw Kaung  was held in ACROS FUKUOKA on September 17, and he introduced his idea and thought on his specialized field in his lecture, talks with panelists.

keynote speech

Dr. Thaw Kaung illustrated different types of traditional manuscripts, the process of how the palm-leaf is made, and the ways of conservation and repair by showing visual images at his keynote speech.  He explained that palm-leaf manuscripts and other old documents now face almost certain destruction and have to be preserved.  “Only by conserving our intellectual history recorded in our traditional manuscripts, we will be able to preserve the indigenous scholarship of our countries that forms an essential part of our national, as well as Asian culture.” he said.

lecture

Professor Okudaira then followed.  He said that the old documents are the fruit of intelligence produced in the natural environment and people’s life to explain how old documents have changed with the lapse of time and their historical background in Myanmar.

Professor Saito, showing the images of actually digitalized old documents, explained the specific interpretation on each of the images.  She said that old documents are valuable to learn the life, custom and culture of people in relevant times.

On opening the website he releases the database of Myanmar socio-economic history, Professor Ito defined the significance of the digitalization by saying that digitalization of traditional texts enables us to preserve them for a long time and in the future, to utilize the data throughout the world in the form of Internet and other media means.

Finally, Professor Ishizawa concluded the forum by commenting that the preservation of old documents is to preserve historical legacy of intelligence, which is actually to protect the culture of Asia.

Arts and Culture Prize 2005: Douangdeuane BOUNYAVONG

Title
Infinite Design – Inherited Textiles
Date
September 18, 2005 (14:00 - 16:00)
Venue
Fukuoka Art Museum, Auditorium
Panelist
Associate Professor Suzuki Reiko (Faculty of Foreign Studies, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Coordnator
Professor Nitta Eiji (Faculty of Law, Economics and the Humanities, Kagoshima University)

Public Lecture by /Ms.  Bounyavong was held in Fukuoka Art Museum, Auditorium on September 18, and she introduced her idea and thought on her specialized field in her lecture, talks with panelists, and special performance.

At the beginning of the forum, Professor Nitta talked briefly the location of Laos and its history while showing a video on Laos, to draw the audience into the charm of the country.

keynote speech

In the following keynote speech, Ms. Bounyavong projected slides to show the scenes of textile weaving in Laos, and to explain the variety of weaving techniques as well as the origin of the designs.  Her talk also covered the role played by textiles in the daily life of Lao people with pleasant episodes.

panel discussion

At the panel discussion, Ms. Bounyavong pointed out that the policy-making and assistance by many organizations are needed to keep the tradition of textiles alive.  She suggested a school for textiles be created since people are not able to learn weaving skills at home any more.  Professor Suzuki commented that women might have put their feelings and dreams into textiles instead of writing letters because they were not given opportunities for education.  

When models clad in traditional Lao costumes, all of which were the collection of Ms. Bounyavong, appeared on the stage, the venue instantly turned colorful and showy.  The audience listened attentively to the explanation on the characteristics of costumes with colorful and distinctive designs as well as on what occasion people wear each of the costumes. 

Professor Nitta concluded the forum by saying “Asia is home to many ethnic people and each group has their unique traditional textiles.  Please visit Asia to see this world of rich textile with your own eyes.”

Arts and Culture Prize 2005: Tashi Norbu

Title
Singing Voice from Himalaya
Date
September 16, 2005 (18:30 - 20:30)
Venue
IMS Hall
Introducer
Professor Fujii Tomoaki (Chubu Institute for Advanced Studies)

Public Lecture by Mr. Tashi Norbu was held in IMS Hall on September 16, and he introduced his idea and thought on his specialized field in his special performance.

Preceding the concert, Professor Fujii introduced the achievements of Mr. Tashi Norbu and outlined the country of Bhutan and its culture by showing photos he himself took.

Performance

Mr. Tashi Norbu then invited Tashi Nencha, a traditional music group he directs on the stage.  The six members dressed in colorful traditional costumes were given a loud applause from the floor. 

Mr. Tashi Norbu gave commentaries on each of the songs and dances, explaining Bhutan’s unique cultural background which is strongly influenced by the Tibetan Buddhism.  The “Kuzu Zangpo,” which is always played as an opening tune at a performance, was performed with unconstrained singing voice and Bhutanese traditional musical instruments.  In a religious mask dance, dancers wearing deer masks bounce around the stage dancing with cymbals.  There were also dances of the Lavab people living in the north-western area as well as people of Sakten village in the north-eastern area of Bhutan.  A total of nine pieces were performed one after another, getting the audience into the world of somewhat nostalgic traditional culture of Bhutan.  As the last program, “Tashi Labey,” the conventional concluding dance in Bhutan was open to all the audience, offering them a happy walk-in performance.

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