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Award Ceremony 2007

The Fukuoka Prize 2007 Award ceremony

Date
September 13, 2007  (18:00-19:40)
Venue
ACROS Fukuoka (Symphony Hall)
MC
Agnes Chang
Participants
1,100

Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess Akishino attended the Award Ceremony, which was chaired by Agnes Chang and attracted 1,100 people.

The Prince praised the winners: “The purpose of the Prize is to contribute to the preservation and creation of Asian cultures. This idea is of great significance and is a precious gem for Asia to be cherished. I would like to offer my sincerest
congratulations to the four laureates, who have not merely made contributions to the cultures of Asia, but have gone so far as to promote advancement of human society as a whole and have disseminated the message.”

The bouquet presentation was carried out from children of the Fukuoka international school afterwards.

Address by Prince Akishino

It is a great pleasure for me to be with you at the award ceremony for the 18th Fukuoka Asian Culture Prizes 2007 here tonight.

Today, we are experiencing a rapid advance of globalization. Although many nations and regions have enjoyed the fruits of their achieved growth, the globalization may force their cultures to be standardized. Through Asia’s richly blessed nature and varying climate, Asia’s long history has fostered diverse and unique cultures. Personally, I have visited various parts of Asia on a number of occasions. On many occasions, I have been impressed by the diversity and the beauty of the indigenous cultures, and feel that the preservation of these cultures is of utmost importance.

The purpose of the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prizes is to contribute to the preservation and creation of Asian cultures. This idea is of great significance and is a precious gem for Asia to be cherished. I would like to offer my sincerest congratulations to the four laureates who will receive the prizes for their great achievements. They have not merely made contributions to the cultures of Asia, but have gone so far as to promote advancement of human society as a whole and have disseminated the message.

Before closing, I would like to wish the laureates the best of luck and prosperity with their future endeavors, and to express my sincere respects to the many persons involved in staging today’s program. I fervidly hope that the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prizes will endorse deeper world understanding of Asia, thus promoting peace and amity in the global society.

Acceptance Speech by Ashis Nandy (Grand Prize)

I am humbled by this honour shown to me by the people of Fukuoka. I do not consider it a reward for my modest personal achievements but as a gesture that cuts across borders of cultures and states in Asia.

It was the dream of freedom fighters in India to reinstate direct cultural exchanges among Asian societies.

They felt that colonialism had disrupted and damaged ancient intellectual and cultural links and Asian cultural interactions were being mediated by the West, mainly the western university system and western scholarship. I look at this award as an effort to restore direct links among Asian societies and cultures, using categories and standards of evaluation that are their own.

Also, the culture of democracy demands that those at the bottom and at the peripheries of the global system be given not merely the right to vote and dissent, but also to defy the textbooks of political theory and participate in reenvisioning
global public life and human future drawing upon their cultural resources. I look at Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize as an effort to acknowledge and celebrate
Asian cultures and deepen global democracy by releasing new creative energies locally. I thank you once again.

Acceptance Speech by Srisakra Vallibhotama (Academic Prize)

The main concern of my study and work is nature and culture. It is a result of my personal experience and academic training that make me aware that younger
generations are prey to industrialization and materialism during the course of westernization and national economic development in the last four decades. They never know themselves, their neighbors and the globalized world. This
is from lack of academic interest in sociology, anthropology and humanity, which are the basis of holistic understanding of man, nature, culture and society.

I am now working for the establishment of local museums by the local people all over the country. A local museum is not a place for collecting and displaying
ethnographical materials and things, but a place for collecting local knowledge and wisdom to be handed down to younger generations. I have been working on the concept and methodology of local history to train the local researchers to construct local knowledge, in the hope that it would be basic and necessary for localization which can coexist with globalization.

Acceptance Speech by JU Ming (Arts and Culture Prize)

To ‘learn’ is only to receive someone else’s technique, and is merely a process. Art requires the opposite attitude, of ‘self-training’. These two are different. Just like Buddhist training in all the spheres of everyday life, one cannot achieve this by knowledge. First of all, we should try to forget what the teachers have taught us. You can express your true self only when you have cleared yourself of
others.

For example, I do my carving quickly. At maximum speed, I make sculptures one after another. When I reach the point where my thinking can no longer keep up with my fast-moving hands, I attain a state of perfect selflessness. Then suddenly my thought is transported into a shape of perfect beauty. Simpler-looking art is, in fact, often more advanced than elaborate workmanship. With razor-sharp cutting, a truly aesthetic shape is born. I always say, ‘art is self-training.’ This is the same as Li Po’s saying ‘The best poem can be created in drunken abandon.’

Acceptance Speech by KIM Duk-soo (Arts and Culture Prize)

As a Changgu artist, I’d just like to say that in any country and for any race in the world, percussion is a universal and especially human musical form, and gives us a natural energy.

In this ‘Global Village’, no one knows when, but ‘digital culture’ has separated people and nature. It is terrible! We cannot live only with digital things. Digital cannot exist without something natural, human and ‘analogue’. This must be the reason why I have had the honor of receiving this prize.

The excitement you feel when playing music, the irrepressible power or energy that penetrates your soul is called ‘Shinmyung’ in Korean. This must be universal in any culture, an innate energy which should be preserved timelessly.

I performed in Fukuoka last January. But 43 years ago, my very first performance in Japan was also in Fukuoka. I am still highly regarded by the city I visited in
Japan. People who, just like me, have devoted themselves to their work will also be given courage and hope. I believe that the spirit of Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize is to encourage people to share their lives and culture with each other.

Celebration Banquet 2007

Date
September 13, 2007 (20:00-21:30)
Venue
ACROS Fukuoka

After the Award Ceremony, a less formal celebration was held. With a person of attendance of local Fukuoka, I praised the honor of the prize winner.

Download the Anuual Report 2007

You can download the annual report 2007 in Adobe PDF to check all the events and programs of the Fukuoka Prize 2007.

Download the Anuual Report 2007

Official program reports

Click to see more 2007 reports.