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Other Events 2013

Academic Prize 2013: Tessa MORRIS-SUZUKI

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Date
Saturday, September 14 (15:00-17:00)
Venue
Kyushu University, Ito Campus
“Now Northeast Asia is facing a significant turning point”

The academic exchange session was held with about 20 academics and student participants who have been influenced by Prof. Morris-Suzuki in different areas, such as political science, sociology, and anthropology. Prof. Morris-Suzuki talked about the international joint project for contemporary Japan and the Northeast Asia that she is currently working on, and emphasized that, “Now Northeast Asia is facing a significant turning point”.

She designated the Japanese-Sino War and the Japanese-Russo War as the First Korean War, in which they fought over the sovereignty of the Korean Peninsula, and designated the Korean War between 1950 and 1953 for determining the Cold War structure after the collapse of the Japanese Empire as the Second Korean War. Then she defined the present circumstances as the Third Korean War, saying that, “The Cold War is still continuing in the Korean Peninsula, which is one of the factors that makes Northeast Asia unstable”.

She indicated the direction of her study in the next few years, commenting that, “We need to thoroughly verify the impact of the First and Second Korean Wars on the surrounding countries”. After that the laureate and the participants exchanged questions and answers in an active discussion.

An exciting exchange with the participants
An exciting exchange with the participants
Mr. Hitoshi YOSHIOKA (Vice President, Kyushu University)
Mr. Hitoshi YOSHIOKA (Vice President, Kyushu University)
Participants in Academic exchange session
Participants in Academic exchange session

Arts and Culture Prize 2013: Nalini MALANI

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Date
Sunday, September 15 (10:30-12:00)
Venue
Fukuoka Asian Museum, Sculpture Lounge
“Setting off each other’s ideas and emotions that happen just like magic”

At the opening of the session, Ms. Malani gave a thorough commentary on her artwork, currently exhibited in the Museum. The 20 art students majoring in History of Aesthetic Art in Kyushu University, who were present at the salon were very excited for the opportunity to appreciate her art and to hear her first-hand commentary at the same time. Prof. Ushiroshoji who acted as the MC told them, “We changed the plan at the last minute to have this session in the Museum so that we can hear a lot of stories in front of her own work”.

The students asked questions such as, “What is the meaning of erasing something you already painted?”, and “How the ’embodiment’ relate to the act of painting?” Ms. Malani answered each question thoroughly. For the question, “What do you keep in mind when you work on a joint project with another artist?”, she answered, “There is always a conflict between two artists that emerges during the course of creation. When that happens, we drop our work; we both calm down and talk to each other. We don’t look for a way to compromise, but rather, it is a process of setting off each other’s ideas and emotions that happen just like magic. That is how we can achieve something completely unexpected in the final outcome”. The laureate’s advice made this session very meaningful for the students.

Narrating her exhibited artwork
Narrating her exhibited artwork
Ms. Nalini MALANI
Ms. Nalini MALANI
Participants in Cultural exchange session
Participants in Cultural exchange session

Arts and Culture Prize 2013: Apichatpong WEERASETHAKUL

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Date
Saturday, September 14 (14:00-16:00)
Venue
Canal City, Business Building, Conference Room
“Attracted by the forest as a mysterious object”

Professor Toshiya Kuroiwa in the Department of Design, Faculty of Fine Arts, Kyushu Sangyo University, also an MC of the session, introduced Mr. Apichatpong’s profile while playing his short film.

After that, the session continued in an interactive form between Mr. Apichatpong and the participants. To one of the participants who said he liked Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives, Mr. Apichatpong commented on the film that, “it has an Asian sense where the people, insects, and many other lives are connected to each other in the past and present on the same level”, and continued to answer other questions in a calm tone of voice. He projected some scenes from his film on the screen from time to time when the question was related to a scene.

When somebody pointed out that he uses the forest as the main stage in many of the director’s works, Mr. Apichatpong talked about his nostalgia for the forest, “I was attracted by the forest as a mysterious object. People were born in the forest and came out from there. Now the people live in a city apart from the forest, but they still have a nostalgic feeling as if drawn to a magnet. Since olden days, people have felt multi-faceted temptations to the forest, such as fear, animism, curse, dream, I don’t want people to ghost, and Mother Nature.”

Answered questions from the participants
Answered questions from the participants
A participant asking questions about his favorite film
A participant asking questions about his favorite film "Uncle Boonmee"
Prof. KUROIWA Toshiya (MC)
Prof. KUROIWA Toshiya (MC)

Download the Anuual Report 2013

You can download the annual report 2013 in Adobe PDF to check all the events and programs of the Fukuoka Prize 2013.

Download the Anuual Report 2013

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