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Public Lectures 2016

Grand Prize 2016: A. R. RAHMAN

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Title
From the Heart: The World of A.R. Rahman’s Music
Date
Saturday, September 17, 2016 (17:00-19:00)
Venue
Event Hall B2F, ACROS Fukuoka

Public lecture will be held at Event Hall B2F, ACROS Fukuoka by inviting Mr. A. R. RAHMAN, a laureate of the Grand Prize. Admission is free. We hope you will join us there.

Mr. Salam UNAGAMI,Music critic, writer, DJ
Mr. Salam UNAGAMI,Music critic, writer, DJ
Event Hall , ACROS Fukuoka
Event Hall , ACROS Fukuoka
Mr. Kenji ISHIZAKA , Professor, Japan Institute of the Moving Image, Programming Director, Tokyo International Film Festival Asian Future Section.
Mr. Kenji ISHIZAKA , Professor, Japan Institute of the Moving Image, Programming Director, Tokyo International Film Festival Asian Future Section.

Part 1:Panel Discussion

“Blending Asia and the West, traditionaland modern, continuing to create music that touches people’s hearts”

forum1-middle1.jpgMr. ISHIZAKA Kenji opened the discussion by citing Mr. Rahman's achievements. He praised his musicality and accomplishments, describing Mr. Rahman as an" artist who has gone beyond the boundaries of film music and stands on par with the likes of Beethoven and the Beatles."During the discussion, Mr. Salam UNAGAMI showed photographs and video from Mr. Rahman's 30-year career as he asked him a series of questions.

---How did you establish your own unique musical style?
“I wanted to fuse India’s musical traditions with Western rock music to create music that appealed to the sensibilities of young people like ourselves.”
---Tell us about your approach to film music composition.
“I watch the film, stimulate my thinking, and incorporate my creativity into the story.”
---Tell us about your feelings towards the devotional music form of qawwali.
“It has a visionary, unforgettable soul. Listening to it cheers me and lifts my heart. My music began with Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.”

The dialogue covered a wide range of topics, and the audience listened enthusiastically to Mr. Rahman’s careful and considered replies to Salam’s questions.

Part 2 Live Performance

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When the enthusiastic performance by Mr. Rahman and his fellow artists ended, the hall erupted with cheers and a standing ovation from the audience.

Performers
Piano: A.R. RAHMAN
Sitar: Asad KHAN
Bass: Mohini DEY
Vocals: Jonita GANDHI

Program
1.Mausam & Escape(From the film, Slumdog Millionaire)
2.Naane Varugiraen(From the film, OK Darling)
3.Agar Tum Saath Ho (If You Were Here)(From the film, Tamasha)
4.Tu Hi Re (Only You)(From the film, Bombay)
5.Latika’s Theme(From the film, Slumdog Millionaire)

Academic Prize 2016: Ambeth R. OCAMPO

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Title
Memory and Amnesia in Public History: Japan-Philippines Relations Revisited
Date
Sunday, September 18, 2016 (11:00-13:00)
Venue
Event Hall B2F, ACROS Fukuoka

Public lecture will be held at Event Hall B2F, ACROS Fukuoka by inviting Mr. Ambeth R. OCAMPO, a laureate of the Academic Prize. Admission is free. We hope you will join us there.

Mr. Kiichi FUJIWARA, Commentator
Mr. Kiichi FUJIWARA, Commentator
Event Hall B2F,ACROS Fukuoka
Event Hall B2F,ACROS Fukuoka
Mr. Hiromu SHIMIZU, Coordinator
Mr. Hiromu SHIMIZU, Coordinator

Part 1:Keynote Speech

“What do we remember of the past, and what do we forget? Proposing a view of history that looks towards the future.”

forum1-middle1.jpgReceiving this prize has led me to reflect on my life and think about why I became an historian, and about why the past is needed for the present and the future. Many of you here today may think that the study of history is irrelevant to you, but as we move towards the future, history is extremely important.

I remember as a child being so excited to see rocks from the moon and to see the Philippines pavilion and the Filipino flag flying in the wind alongside the other nation's flags at the Expo'70 Osaka.

That Expo turned my eyes towards the diversity of cultures in the world and to the concept of national identity.

I saw the Japanese film, Samurai, as a child, and my uncle wasa great Japanophile. However, there are Filipinos who lost family members at the hands of the Japanese Army under Japanese occupation, and different generations have different views of Japan. The Japanese people remember the dropping of the atomic bomb as the victims. However, there is no mention of the actions of the Japanese military in South-East Asia. There is a gap in our mutual memoires.

If we go back even further in the history of Japan-Philippines relations, at the end of the 16th century, there were already more than 1,000 Japanese living in the Philippines, working in occupations such as traders and merchants, craftsman, and bodyguards. There are deep connections between our two countries on various levels, such as Luzon jars, the Christian daimyo, Takayama Ukon, and historical figures such as Mariano Ponce and Artemio Ricarte, who spent time in Japan.

By collecting small pieces of information that on their own are not very useful, we can gain a deeper understanding and develop insight into historical connections. What parts of history do we remember and why do we remember them? We can use our memories of the past to understand the present and think about the future. Finally, I would like to leave you with the words of the Filipino naotinal hero, José Rizal.

"We enter the future, with a memory of the past."

Part 2:Panel Discussion

“Having overcome anti-Japanese sentiment, what do our two countries need to do to continue their bilateral exchange?”

Professor Fujiwara revealed his first impressions of Dr. Ocampo, whom he heard speak at an academic conference in 1989, not long after the fall of the Marcos regime. He recalled his surprise at the way Dr. Ocampo spoke about the Filipino national hero, José Rizal, from his own unique perspective, interspersing it with trivia about Rizal’s personality and attire. He spoke about Dr. Ocampo’s refusal to fantasize about the past, instead trying to capture a true picture of history. In the Q&A session, audience members posed a variety of questions, such as how Japan and the Philippines have managed to overcome the anti-Japanese sentiment of the post-War period and build a friendly relationship, the background to President Duterte’s anti-American statements, and what Japan and the Philippines should take care with to build good relations. Dr. Ocampo answered all of these questions in his gentle way. Professor Fujiwara closed the discussion with the observation that learning about others with the kind of curiosity and desire to know“ why” that Dr. Ocampo displays would become the foundations for our future.

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Arts and Culture Prize 2016: Yasmeen LARI

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Title
Emerging from Catastrophe: Lari's Barefoot Social Architecture
Date
Sunday, September 18, 2016 (14:00-16:00)
Venue
Event Hall B2F, ACROS Fukuoka

Public lecture will be held at Event Hall B2F, ACROS Fukuoka by inviting Ms. Yasmeen LARI, a laureate of the Art and Culture Prize. Admission is free. We hope you will join us there.

Ms. Mayumi MORI as panelist
Ms. Mayumi MORI as panelist
Mr. Yoshinobu FUKASAWA as panelist
Mr. Yoshinobu FUKASAWA as panelist
Professor Keiyo FUJIHARA as coordinator
Professor Keiyo FUJIHARA as coordinator

Part 1:Keynote Speech

“Using local natural materials and vernacular methods to replace the cycle of dependence on aid with a culture of self-reliance”

forum1-middle1.jpgThe Heritage Foundation of Pakistan, of which I am Chair, not only manages cultural heritage sites, but also conducts humanitarian aid work. Pakistan has many sites of ancient heritage that date back to the Bronze Age, the Indus Valley Civilization, and the Buddhist culture of Gandhara. The buildings from those eras abound in strength and durability, and the Foundation does a variety of work to preserve and disseminate knowledge about that heritage.

After the Great Earthquake that struck Pakistan in 2005, killing 80,000 and rendering 400,000 families homeless, I began my humanitarian aid work as a “barefoot architect.” Even since just 2010, it feels as if Pakistan has been struck by floods, cyclones, and earthquakes nearly every year, so we must remain constantly vigilant. Moreover, Pakistan is a developing nation and many people are living in poverty. There is increasing dependence on aid from the international community, which is robbing the people affected of their self-respect and independence. This is a truly serious and important problem.

To counter this, I am pursuing a “barefoot social architecture” initiative. With the cooperation of the people affected by the disasters, I have designed shelters that can be built with vernacular methods using natural materials such as clay, lime, and bamboo, which can be sourced locally. Because these shelters cost very little to make, and the affected people can build them themselves, this initiative is helping to create a shift away from dependence on aid towards a culture of self-reliance. Also, because the clay, lime, and bamboo involved are all natural materials, these shelters are extremely low in carbon emissions, making them environmentally-friendly to construct and maintain.

I have come up with certain principles for post-disaster reconstruction. Firstly, use cultural heritage and tradition to nurture pride and confidence. Next, use sustainable materials and avoid harming the environment. Further, use local materials and techniques for quicker delivery. Finally, develop and implement disaster risk-reduction strategies to strengthen resistance against disasters.

Many people in Pakistan are living in poverty, but in times of disaster, it is women and children who are affected the most. I am puttnig particular effort into the empowerment of women and children, such as teaching them how to build not only their own homes, but also kitchens with smoke-free ovens and eco-toilets at a very low cost, so they can look after their homes and families in a sanitary way.

I hope to continue my work to support people affected by disasetrs and to help them become independent.

Official program reports

Click to see more 2016 reports.